fSpace Talks – MOJO Digital Studio

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Miles Noel of MOJO Digital Studio has an interesting background and an interesting collection of skills.

Miles counts graphic designer, illustrator, painter, artist, photographer and muralist amongst his talents.

Leveraging a passion for heritage and architecture, Miles looks at the commercial side of design and uses his artistic side to explore ideas.

A love of variety, change and new challenges precipitated yearlong travel through Europe and South America. That travel, along with 18 months of living in Montreal – quietly one of the coolest cities in the world – inspired Miles and his work. It also gave him international perspective and European influence on his designs.

His love of science has also impacted his work. One such example was the Science Fiction/Science Future project for BHP Billiton where he developed an exhibition and then photographed it as part of the development of marketing collateral.

Science was behind another exhibition with his collection ‘SCI-POP Portraits’, which was commissioned for National Science Week 2013. The exhibition showcased silkscreen portraits, stop-motion and time-lapse info videos of Western Australian scientists who made significant contributions to science from 220 years ago to present day.

Miles has exhibited his work on several continents. While in Montreal, he exhibited an art project based on Expo 67, the remarkable category one world fair held in Montreal in 1967.

His company, MOJO Digital Studio, offers graphic design, illustration and photography services related to branding and brand consultancy, infographics, stationary and other print collateral.

Specializing in digital design, Miles works with WordPress websites, animated GIFs, HTML web banners and all social media, including e-newsletter campaigns.

Miles’ photography focuses on building interiors and exteriors, portraits, products, food, events and lifestyle.

Miles sees himself as “a lens between his clients and their customers” as he offers design, illustration and photography services.

MOJO Digital Studio has a wide assortment of clients touching on a variety of projects, including collaborations with several fSpace members.

Visit mojodigitalstudio.com to see more projects from MOJO Digital Studio and milesnoel.com to view (and buy!) some of Miles’ stunning artwork.

Business Development Program Open for Applications

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fSpace recently celebrated our 4th birthday with an event that included a visit from Mayor Brad Pettitt.

The mayor was on hand to formally announce funding for a third Business Development Program – a collaborative program between fSpace and The City of Fremantle that provides financial support to businesses within the creative industries.

Mayor Pettitt said, “The Business Development Program is a unique collaboration between the City of Fremantle and fSpace designed to promote the local creative and knowledge economy, assist start-ups and small business to grow and to encourage innovation in Fremantle.”

“This program has been a great driver in attracting individuals and businesses from outside Fremantle, with the majority of participants still going strong here in Fremantle.”

fSpace owner, Sabine Albers, said that over the two previous years, this program has helped over 20 businesses develop and grow in Fremantle.

“In addition to the financial support towards a professional workspace, businesses have benefited from the inspiring energy, collaborations, and strong sense of community at fSpace.”

She added that some former program participants have grown their businesses and are now in larger, dedicated offices in Fremantle.

“Our members, including former program participants, are doing ground breaking and award winning things in a variety of industries, including creative, health, professional services and technology.”

The Business Development Program offers qualified businesses and start-ups three to six months of subsidised workspace at fSpace.

To be eligible for the program, a business must fall within the creative industries sector. These are businesses that are primarily focused on individual creativity, skill and talent.

Curve Tomorrow was one of the first participants of this program when they expanded to Western Australia from offices in Melbourne.

Mo Jaimangal, a cofounder and director of Curve Tomorrow, previously explained during an fSpace Talks Event that they seek to positively impact the lives of 1 billion people by applying their knowledge of technology in health and medical services.

 

When the mayor asked for an example of this, Mo spoke about the work they’ve done with leading autism researchers to automate the diagnosis of children on the autism spectrum.

He explained, “We’ve taken what they were doing – a very manual process with psychologists observing children playing with toys, timing them with a stopwatch and making notes with pen and paper – and created a game that can be played on an iPad.”

“In addition to a quicker and more efficient diagnosis that leads to earlier treatments, this assessment can be done anywhere. We collect and store the test results on a secure cloud, where psychologists can look at them and decide on treatments.”

The Business Development Program is available to new business start-ups as well as existing businesses that are looking to develop and grow from Fremantle.

This year’s program has added optional coaching and mentorship towards developing a formal business plan – a crucial step for any new business start up.

Sabine Albers said she loves the diversity of the people who share and make her fSpace what it is.

“It’s really exciting to have such a mix of passionate people doing so many interesting and helpful things. The energy this creates is just fantastic.”

Sabine added that values of empathy, respect and support continue to create an inspiring atmosphere that not only helps maximize productivity, but also creates an environment that people want to a part of.

To learn more about the Business Development Program, visit fspace.me/business.

fSpace Talks – Curve Tomorrow

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Think about the business you have or work at.

What goals does it have in terms of reaching and impacting people?

Curve Tomorrow is a fascinating international business that exists to improve the lives of people by solving challenging problems. Their humble goal is “to positively impact the lives of 1 billion people”.

Mohinder Jaimangal, a founder and director of Curve Tomorrow, readily admits that their goal of 1 billion is incredibly ambitious, but also notes that with the nearby populations of India and Asia, it’s not as farfetched as it might first seem.

Curve Tomorrow was founded in 2009 by a group of university friends in Melbourne, Australia. To understand the business, it’s important to understand a little about these friends and how they came to work together.

After perhaps wisely moving on from dreams of a career as a professional basketball player, Mo studied mechatronics – technology combining software, electronics and mechanical engineering – at The University of Melbourne.

After graduating, he joined Object Consulting, a consultancy that specialized in software development. While expecting to work on robotics, he spent most of his time creating apps for banking and telecommunication clients.

This consultancy led to an interesting role in a decidedly larger company, Holden. Working with a good friend and future cofounder of Curve Tomorrow, Mo helped lead an innovation and development team for Holden and General Motors worldwide.

Working out of Melbourne and GM headquarters in Detroit with eye-popping budgets, Mo worked on concept cars by developing 10-year innovation plans with trend analysis and user interface designs for vehicles of the future.

After Holden, Mo joined Dius, a startup technology company that specialized in pure agile software development. Coming in when there were nine people in the company, Dius has since grown to over 125 employees. It was here Mo experienced the roller coaster ride of how a start-up transitions into a small-medium enterprise.

Throughout all these roles, Mo came to realize the importance of two factors that would influence the direction of his career. One – doing work that contributed a positive social impact, and two – appreciating the value and enjoyment of working with good friends.

Both these elements were present when Mo helped start Bliss, a luxury chocolate label and retail chain in India. In addition to marketing a luxury product, Bliss had significant social reinvestment and worked towards breaking barriers and creating opportunities for the disadvantaged.

This of course led the same university friends combining to create Curve Tomorrow. Now, less than 10 years later, they’ve expanded to have offices in Australia, USA, India, Sri Lanka and France.

Their main focus is currently on healthcare, however they have plans to venture into education and environmental areas as well.

Incorporating best practices from previous businesses, the directors of Curve Tomorrow have implemented three key strategic principles: lean startup, design thinking and agile development. This approach has led to multiple awards, which has raised their profile and opened doors to funding opportunities.

Curve Tomorrow is interesting in that they do not focus on job titles. While each director has a role that relates to responsibilities normally associated with a CEO or CFO, they are in such constant communication that there is substantial overlap. They also promote an open, equal culture where everyone is valued, which is why ‘junior’ or ‘senior’ titles are not used in their company.

Projects range from process automation improvement in hospitals to automating existing research processes. Research into these areas has afforded them full access to all aspects of health care delivery, including even into operating theatres during surgical procedures.

Curve Tomorrow has worked with world-class health organizations around the world to improve efficiencies, solve clinical problems and commercialize intellectual property.

One example is the development of HeadCheckTM, an app that helps parents and coaches recognize the signs and symptoms of concussion in children. Designed by leading child concussion experts in Australia, this app is endorsed by the AFL and is available for free download.

An example of improving efficiencies is their development of a Q-MaxTM, a desktop app that enables a team at the Victorian Clinical Genetics Services to perform research and screening for epigenetic mutations (a genetic condition) more accurately and efficiently.

Q-MaxTM took a practice that routinely took four days to process thousands of samples over multi-step spreadsheet analysis and reduced it to a seamless ten-second task. This new process also eliminated data entry error, which results in better outcomes from the research.

Curve Tomorrow also co-developed PeersTM, an iPad app that is the first digital and objective assessment tool to enable early detection of social disorders in children. Traditional detection processes typically include observing children, documenting findings on a written report, and then inputting the information into a program for analysis. PeersTM is an age appropriate game that children play while being automatically assessed for primary characteristics of autism spectrum disorders. This lets health professionals detect social behaviour problems more quickly and easily, leading to critical early intervention treatments.

It’s work like this that makes it easy to hope Curve Tomorrow reaches their lofty goals as soon as possible.

Check out www.curvetomorrow.com for more information.

fSpace Talks – Ric Cairns, Brandino

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Like many of the best creatives, Ric Cairns’ journey to become a creative director took some unexpected and unorthodox turns.

As a teenager, Ric saw a career as a writer – his true passion – as pie in the sky, so he studied civil engineering at UWA (he followed a high school friend there!). He completed his four-year degree, but his heart wasn’t in engineering, so he took his first sharp turn: via the university radio station into broadcasting.

Radio allowed Ric to combine his love of music with his love of language – he crafted written talk-breaks to make his on-air work as interesting as possible. The approach apparently worked well as he progressed to a regular afternoon session on 96FM (where they obviously rewarded hair growth).

All that creative writing on the run must have whet his appetite, because he started trying his hand at advertising in his spare time. It got serious when he did the industry course for creatives – AWARD School – and took off the WA prize.

This brought a call from the precurser of The Brand Agency, inviting him to give up his radio gig to write for them. In some really awkward timing, the same day he got that offer, the radio ratings were announced, giving his show the biggest audience in Perth. (In true ‘80s style this was referred to as being the ‘King of Radio’…)

Understandably, Ric hung around to enjoy his regal position for a while, but he came to realise there were only so many ways to make the weather sound interesting. So, just the following year, his career went around another hairpin: he left radio to fully immerse himself in advertising as a writer.

In a very memorable first year, Ric won a prize at a Campaign Brief workshop that sent him to Sydney to work and learn at legendary Australian ad agency The Campaign Palace. And in that fateful week, he wrote a risque TV ad for Cleo Magazine’s 50 Most Eligible Bachelors that went on to win Gold at the London International Awards – and be one of the most complained-about commercials in Australian history.

This put Ric quickly on the advertising radar – and on the cover of Campaign Brief magazine…

Three years into his advertising career, Ric became creative director of The Shorter Group, a new agency introducing integrated multidisciplinary creative services. As department head, Ric built a strong team of writers, art directors, graphic designers and 3D designers who all worked together to bring brand strategies to life. It must have been a great pitch, because new business doubled the size of the agency in nine months.

From 2000, Ric also served as president of the Perth Advertising and Design Club, helping promote creativity in advertising and design. He led the creation of two of the club’s most fondly remembered annual award shows.

When the economic party ended, The Shorter Group merged with Perth’s biggest agency Marketforce, where Ric remained creative head on the Shorter’s accounts. He worked on many major projects over almost a decade, including creating a five-year global campaign for Tourism WA.

All those years working with designers eventually saw Ric spending more time on design himself. With a particular passion for identity, he finally stepped out of Marketforce in 2011 to try to broaden the nature of his work. This most recent twist in his story was the beginning of Brandino, his own consultancy that allows him to work directly with clients across all aspects of their brand communications: strategy, identity, design, writing, and increasingly film-making.

Ric is focused on ideas, a passion he has shared through guest lectures at various universities. His design philosophy is about “adding meaning and memorability to what we do”. He looks for visual ideas with potential for diverse applications, to create interesting and engaging brands – his work for Interchange WA is a notable example.

Brandino has consulted across all mediums in most areas of industry. From designing exhibitions, to creating unique business cards or compelling annual reports, to building entirely new brand identities, Ric has done just about everything. His new portfolio site at www.brandino.com.au showcases diverse examples from the last ten years.

Ric concluded his talk by inviting fSpace members to reach out to him, to explore opportunities to collaborate. Working on a wide range of projects, he’s always looking to be inspired by – and learn from – good people.

That way, perhaps he’ll find the next twist or turn on his journey.

fSpace Talks – Marie Wong

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Marie Wong was the latest to share what she does at a recent fSpace Talks event. Marie is a lawyer and trade mark attorney who specializes in intellectual property (IP) and works from fSpace one day a week. Marie is a Principal of Wrays, a specialist IP practice that provides advice and assistance in all areas of IP protection and branding strategy, with offices across Australia.

While Marie focuses on brand protection (incorporating trade marks, copyright, domain names, branding & e-commerce), she works closely with her other IP colleagues at Wrays who specialize in the filing and enforcement of registered designs and patents across scientific fields such as engineering, computing, chemistry and life sciences. The focus of Wrays and Marie’s practice as an IP lawyer is supporting creativity and innovation.

Marie described IP as the intangible property of the mind which gives rise to a tangible and valuable product or outcome for society.

Marie provided an overview of the different types of IP that all businesses – large or small – deal with every day. Marie provided an example of today’s smartphones, which are protected by: over 1000 patents, including for their semiconductors, batteries and screens; copyright protecting the artwork and software code; design rights to protect aesthetics; and, of course, trade marks – the brand names, logos and other distinctive signs (including shape marks) by which products such as the “iPhone” are differentiated.

Whilst copyright (protecting the expression of words, software code and artistic form) is an unregistered right, which is automatically granted, and has a ‘long life’ protection (typically 70 years after the death of the author), other rights – such as registered design and patent rights – need to be applied for (usually before any commercial use or disclosure) and last only 10 to 20 years from the date the design/patent was registered.

Trade marks, the area in which Marie works most, can be registered or unregistered and have a potentially unlimited lifespan. Marie works with a variety of clients from a range of different industries to identify and protect their core brands, and regularly assists clients with trade mark audits, searching and clearance (for proposed brand names, logos and taglines), and trade mark filing and enforcement, both locally and overseas. She also helps her clients prevent cybersquatting by watching and protecting new domain names and extensions, and filing complaints when necessary.

One client is another member from fSpace who is a graphic designer. Marie has worked with the designer and her client to ensure that a proposed new brand identity was available for registration as a domain name and trade mark, and to secure registered trade mark protection for the new brand name. Marie regularly works with creative agencies to identify legal issues in the use and roll-out of creative and marketing collateral, including websites and digital marketing.

Marie also noted her own experience with seeking registration of a trade mark for “Roaming Kitchen”, a side-project that Marie and fellow fSpace member, Kim-Vu Salamonsen, have been working on to promote a “unique pop-up kitchen, roaming
through different rooms, flavours and musical delights in sunny Perth,
Western Australia”, based in Fremantle. The trade mark encountered difficulties to registration because the name of the restaurant, Roaming Kitchen, was deemed to be a common term or descriptor and therefore ineligible for trademark protection. Marie described the process of preparing submissions and gathering evidence of use, in the role of the “client”, to try and get this trade mark across the line.

Thanks to Marie for giving us a glimpse into the world of IP and the protections that go with it. Anyone wanting advice on IP is welcome to contact Marie at marie.wong@wrays.com.au.

fSpace Talks – Troy Gerwien

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Troy was the latest to present at our fSpace Talks series, but he took his presentation in a different direction.

Troy is an IT consultant, software developer and web developer. He’s worked in and consulted for a variety of businesses, NGOs, as well as in the health & education sectors. Troy recently started his own company, Structable, but instead chose to focus his talk on some interesting volunteer work he’s involved in.

CoderDojo is a grass-roots charitable organization that was created to provide free mentoring to children aged 7-17 on how to code software. CoderDojo was founded in 2011 by a teenager, James Whelton. In 2010, young James enjoyed 5 minutes of fame for successfully hacking an iPod he’d won.

Just a few years after opening the first CoderDojo, there are now over 1000 locations spread across 63 countries. CoderDojo has a goal of 1500 locations teaching coding to 100,000 children.

Each Dojo club operates independently and while there are some structures, there are no curriculums or strict frameworks. Kids can (and are encouraged to) create whatever they want, including games, apps, music, and websites.

Troy volunteers at the Fremantle Dojo and he shared how he applies the fundamentals to coding (steps, loops & decisions) in helping kids learn how to code. Troy showed that unlike the typical black screen with all the lines that professional coders live in, CoderDojos use Scratch – a visual and intuitive coding program created by some very smart people at MIT.

Some good reasons for kids to learn coding include:

  • It helps opens doors
  • Much like our smartphones, technology is becoming simpler
  • It provides an endlessly creative outlet
  • It promotes systematic thinking
  • Lots of kids love it

Another good reason is the surprising prediction that by the year 2025, roughly 50% of all jobs are likely to be obsolete. Creative thinking and the ability to break down steps to work out options and processes will be critical skills as new jobs emerge.

Troy showed us that coding with Scratch is much like playing with Lego – you can select options, move things around and create a lot of different things.

With our input, Troy created a basic spaceship game from a blank screen in about 10 minutes. As he would with a kid at the Fremantle Dojo, he described each step in creating the game as he used the intuitive drag-and-drop blocks the Scratch programming tool provides.

Visit coderdojo.com for more information or visit the Fremantle Dojo, which meets every Wednesday from 3:30 pm to 5:00 pm at the Fremantle City Library. Anyone interested in becoming a mentor or enrolling a child can stop by during these hours.

Thanks Troy for the presentation!

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fSpace Talks – Credi

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PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 25: fSpace Talks Credi, Juan and Patrick January 25, 2017 in Fremantle, Perth, Australia (Photo by Sabine Albers)

The 2017 edition of fSpace Talks began with Juan Vazquez & Patrick Green sharing what they do at Credi.

Juan shared some interesting statistics that most people might not be aware of:

  • Over 2.3 million businesses start up in the US are funded each year with loans from friend, family or business colleagues
  • The average loan amount is $23,000 (USD)
  • In Australia alone, over $1.6 billion (AUD) is loaned each year between family, friends and business colleagues
  • In the UK, 40% of deposits for first time home buyers are provided by friends

This type of lending outside of banking and other structured channels is often informal and can create problems. Questions or misunderstandings about repayment amounts or schedules can damage relationships.

Credi was founded and started by CEO Tim Dean (who also works from fSpace with the team) in May 2015 to help facilitate relationship lending and protect those relationships. Credi does this by adding structure and compliance as they automate the lending process.

Credi has created a loan builder application that allows the lender and borrower to input the amount, the repayment schedule (time & frequency) and an interest rate if they wish. The parties can share the loan with anyone including family members, friends, business associates, or other entities such as trusts and SMSFs. Business professionals such as accountants and financial planners will be able to manage the process as well for their clients.

Once the parameters are agreed to, the parties eSign and Credi generates a legally binding contract. Credi then manages the loan for each party by tracking the repayments, creating alerts as desired. Credi also allows for amendments to be made including changes to the loan, payment deferrals or even forgiving the loans.

While there are some other tools in the marketplace to deliver template legal loan contracts, Credi is the only one that combines delivers a complete start-to-end process into one friendly environment.

Credi has a larger team behind the scenes with 8 other people contributing in areas such as legal, programming, advisors, and operations. This includes collaboration with Letty Tan, a bookkeeping who also runs her business from fSpace.

Much like companies like Airbnb, Credi does not handle any money – only the agreement services and management of the loan repayment schedule.

Credi is currently in the beta-testing phase of their rollout strategy and they are excited with their formal launch coming in the next couple of weeks.

Thanks to Juan & Patrick for the presentation & best of luck to the Credi team with their launch!

Visit credi.com for more information.

PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 25: fSpace Talks Credi, Juan and Patrick January 25, 2017 in Fremantle, Perth, Australia (Photo by Sabine Albers)PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 25: fSpace Talks Credi, Juan and Patrick January 25, 2017 in Fremantle, Perth, Australia (Photo by Sabine Albers)PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIA - JANUARY 25: fSpace Talks Credi, Juan and Patrick January 25, 2017 in Fremantle, Perth, Australia (Photo by Sabine Albers)

New Sales & Marketing Manager

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fSpace is pleased to announce that Jason Normandale has joined fSpace as Sales & Marketing Manager.

In addition to helping promote fSpace and attract new members, Jason will also be directly involved in our continuing efforts to enhance the fSpace atmosphere and experience as we strive to provide the best and most inspiring environment for our members to produce their best work.

Jason can be reached at jason@fspace.me or 0427 929 186 – welcome Jason!

fSpace + Loop

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fSpace is pleased to announce a partnership with Loop!

Loop is a cool group of people who are linking coworking spaces around the world. Loop offers monthly plans that lets its members work at over 90 (and counting) coworking spaces for free or discounted rates.

fSpace members receive a free membership to Loop.

For more info, check out Loop at https://loop.space/

fSpace 3rd Birthday

100 Days of 50% Off!

By | Internet, Special Offer, Startups | No Comments

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To celebrate our new crazy fast 100 x 100 mbps fibre optic internet connection, fSpace is offering a crazy 100 day promotion. For 100 days, all new plans are half-price for the first month!

This is a perfect offer for anyone looking to escape a home office that might be overrun with friends & family or anyone looking to take a swing at a new year’s resolution to start that new business.

While the price is 50% off, you still get 100% of everything. Best of all, new members get the opportunity to join our fabulous community of inspiring entrepreneurs, freelancers and professionals.

Check out http://fspace.me/special/ for more details.

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